Deciding on where to live is always a big decision. When you’re young, your choice may be based on your proximity to shops, restaurants, entertainment, and where you work. If you have children or pets, you might choose to live close to quality schools, parks and families with playmates. As we get older, health concerns, mobility issues, decreased income, and maintenance costs influence our decision on where to live.

Home Ownership

Owning a home is part of the American dream and many people plan to remain in their homes until they die. This isn’t always possible, but if it is your intention, there are ways to help make it happen. A reverse mortgage or home equity loan can help with living costs and any remodeling needed to address mobility or maintenance issues. Or having a family member who lives with you to provide support, or finding a living situation where there are family, friends or even a support service nearby could be the answer.

Rental Properties

If owning a home and handling all the responsibilities that go along with home ownership are overwhelming, living in a rental community or subsidized housing focusing on the needs of seniors may be a welcome option.

Continuum of Care

Living independently becomes increasingly challenging the older we get. Some circumstances make it virtually impossible for seniors to continue living independently. As more care is needed, knowing what home and community services are available near you can help you access the support you need while remaining at home longer. In-home hospice care may also be an option to consider, depending on your circumstances.

If remaining at home is not feasible, there are many assisted living and residential long-term care facilities that provide varying levels of care. Retirement communities provide services along the continuum of care as your needs change. Having someone to help and support you when you’re looking into facilities is important because, no matter where you end up, you want to receive the best care from a compassionate staff.

Nursing Home Care

People don’t typically get to choose where they receive nursing home care, but with proper planning you can give yourselves more options.

Choosing the right nursing home is critical—and there are many to choose from. There are ways to ensure you find a good fit and the best care for yourself or a loved one. Researching facilities is an important step to ensure quality care.

By visiting a nursing home you are considering unannounced, asking questions about ownership and staff, interviewing the nursing home administrator regarding their philosophy of care, and checking with the local Long Term Care Ombudsman, you can get a better picture of what happens behind the scenes.

Since nursing home residents are elderly and often ill, their frail and vulnerable state can make advocating for their own needs a challenge. Any resident within a nursing home has rights—and nursing homes must not infringe upon those rights. By being involved in the care of a nursing home resident and visiting regularly, you will know if he or she is receiving quality care and their needs are met in a respectful manner.

Knowing how to advocate for a loved one in a nursing home is crucial to receiving the best care. When needed, consult a knowledgeable elder law attorney. There are many quality and care issues that may come up, and Stone Law can and guidance when it’s needed to ensure you always get the best care for you or your loved one.

This summary of Housing Options was prepared by Stone Law, LLC and is intended to give general information, not specific legal advice. For more information, contact Stone Law at 877-897-6591.

While we make a concerted effort to maintain and update the information on this site Stone Law, LLC makes no representation, warranty, or claim that the information on this site is current or accurate. Additionally, please be aware that state laws may differ, do not rely solely on information provided on this site without consulting a local attorney.